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Honeycomb - Pythagoreans perceived the hexagon as an expression of the spirit of Aphrodite, whose sacred number was six (the dual Triple Goddess), and worshipped bees as her sacred creatures who understood how to create perfect hexagons in their honeycomb. Seeking to understand the secrets of nature through geometry, the Pythagoreans meditated on the endless triangular lattice, all sixty degree angles, that results from extending the sides of all hexagons in the honeycomb diagram until their lines meet in the center of adjacent hexagons. It seemed to them a revelation of the underlying symmetry of the cosmos. Moreover, since honey and salt were the only commonly known preservatives at the time, both were symbols of ressurrection or reincarnation. The dead were often embalmed in honey, especially in the large pithoi or burial vases, where they were placed in fetal position for rebirth. Demeter was “the pure mother bee” who governed the cycles of life, as was the biblical Deborah whose name means “bee.” Honey cakes formed like female genitals figured prominently in worship of the Goddess. The bee was usually looked upon as a symbol of the feminine potency of nature, because it created this magical, good tasting substance and stored it in hexagonal cells of geometric mystery. With so many ancient connections with the Goddess, it was inevitable that medieval hyms addressed the virgin Mary as a “nest of honey” and “dripping honeycomb.” #dothemath #sacredgeometry #stopstaring  (Taken with Instagram at Marshall’s Farm Honey)

Honeycomb - Pythagoreans perceived the hexagon as an expression of the spirit of Aphrodite, whose sacred number was six (the dual Triple Goddess), and worshipped bees as her sacred creatures who understood how to create perfect hexagons in their honeycomb. Seeking to understand the secrets of nature through geometry, the Pythagoreans meditated on the endless triangular lattice, all sixty degree angles, that results from extending the sides of all hexagons in the honeycomb diagram until their lines meet in the center of adjacent hexagons. It seemed to them a revelation of the underlying symmetry of the cosmos. Moreover, since honey and salt were the only commonly known preservatives at the time, both were symbols of ressurrection or reincarnation. The dead were often embalmed in honey, especially in the large pithoi or burial vases, where they were placed in fetal position for rebirth. Demeter was “the pure mother bee” who governed the cycles of life, as was the biblical Deborah whose name means “bee.” Honey cakes formed like female genitals figured prominently in worship of the Goddess. The bee was usually looked upon as a symbol of the feminine potency of nature, because it created this magical, good tasting substance and stored it in hexagonal cells of geometric mystery. With so many ancient connections with the Goddess, it was inevitable that medieval hyms addressed the virgin Mary as a “nest of honey” and “dripping honeycomb.” #dothemath #sacredgeometry #stopstaring (Taken with Instagram at Marshall’s Farm Honey)

  1. thefarmersblock reblogged this from f22ism and added:
    #astonishing
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